wildforbees.ca
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Building bee hotels across Canada,
because bees-in-need deserve rest indeed.

4 steps of POLLINATION

WHY ARE CANADIAN BEES UNDER THREAT?

Environments Icon

UNHEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS
Pollinators have to contend with toxins, pests and diseases in their surroundings, which impact their health and their ability to forage.

Habitat Icon

LOSS & FRAGMENTATION OF HABITAT
The greatest threat to bee populations is loss and fragmentation of habitat. Without a place to find food, water and nesting sites, bee populations could suffer to the point of extinction.

DID YOU KNOW...

World Icon

Bees keep our ecosystem in check and provide well over $217 billion worth of crop pollinating services across the world! Our plants (and pocketbooks) depend on a healthy bee population.

WHAT IS A BEE HOTEL?

A bee hotel is a sustainable resting space for solitary bees, which make up over 90% of the bee population and work independently to spread pollen from plant to plant, flower to flower. While other types of bees, like honeybees and bumblebees, typically work and nest in groups, solitary bees visit flowers and nest individually.

All across the world, populations of solitary bees are declining. Habitat loss and fragmentation are a leading cause, and we’re working harder than ever to support Canadian solitary bees, in all their buzzing glory. The WILD FOR BEESTM bee hotels will provide solitary bees with a place to rest their weary wings.

HOW DO YOU MAKE A BEE HOTEL?

download the plans »
Bee hotel locations map

CHECK-OUT WHERE BEES ARE CHECKING-IN

We’re working harder than ever to support Canadian solitary bees, in all their buzzing glory. The WILD FOR BEESTMbee hotels will provide solitary bees with a place to rest their weary wings. Locate a bee hotel close to you and come out for a visit!

BEE HOTELS

STUDENT BUILDS

ABOUT THE BEES

Local Native Pollinators Working Hard and in Need of Help:

Bumble Bee
British Columbia

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Mason Bees – Osmia species
Apples, Pears, and Peaches

In BC throughout areas like the Okanagan Valley hard working mason bees help apple, pear, and peach trees make delicious fruit for us to eat. Orchard trees are highly pollinator dependent, often requiring cross pollination for fruit and seeds to be formed.

Like all pollinators, the pollinators of apples, pears, and peaches need habitat to live in when these trees aren’t flowering. Apple, pear, and peach trees only flower for a short period of time. To make sure that there are enough pollinators when they are needed there needs to be habitat near orchards that blooms throughout the seasons. Pesticide use in and around orchards can also significantly impact the health of these important pollinators. Reducing or eliminating the use of insecticides, or applying when native bees are not on flowers is a key way to help.

Sweat Bee
Manitoba

MANITOBA

Mining bees - Andrena species
Leaf-cutter bees - Megachile species
Sweat Bees - Halictus species
Canola, Sunflower, and Flax Seeds

Oils we use everyday! Oil seed crops attract and are pollinated by a range of small native bees. Many scientists have been surprised by home many different species can be found in a single field.

As crop fields get bigger the habitat for these native pollinators decreases. Leaving areas of natural habitat or adding hedgerows to fields helps keep these populations of pollinators healthy.

Mining Bee
Ontario

ONTARIO

Squash Bees - Peponapis species
bumblebees - Bombus species
Apples, Peaches, melons, cucumber and tomatoes

Ontario grows some of the largest diversity of crops in Canada. Each crop type requires a pollinator that needs habitat near to the field or orchard.

Apples and Peaches - Orchard trees are highly pollinator dependent, often requiring cross pollination for fruit and seeds to be formed.

Like all pollinators, the pollinators of apples, pears, and peaches need habitat to live in when these trees aren’t flowering. Apple, pear, and peach trees only flower for a short period of time. To make sure that there are enough pollinators when they are needed there needs to be habitat near orchards that blooms throughout the seasons. Pesticide use in and around orchards can also significantly impact the health of these important pollinators. Reducing or eliminating the use of insecticides, or applying when native bees are not on flowers is a key way to help.

Melons and Cucumbers – A special group of bees called Squash Bees (Peponapis spp.) visit melons, cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins and other squash. These bees are specially adapted to fit right into the flower of these crops and be the most efficient pollinators. Like other pollinators of specialty crops that have a short bloom period, these pollinators need habitat throughout the season to keep their population healthy and strong.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are grown in field and in green houses in Ontario – they make up a large part of our diet and are in so many cultural dishes. Tomatoes are very dependent on pollination from bumblebees (Bombus spp.) that are able to buzz the flowers at just the right frequency to release the pollen.

Bumblebees are large, colonial species that have very large requirements for food and space compared to other smaller bees. When habitats are fragmented bumblebees suffer more than others. Keeping good corridors and connections, as well as a great diversity of flowers from the spring to the fall is key to having healthy bumblebee populations – and tomatoes!

Leaf Cutting Bee
Quebec

QUEBEC

Blueberry bees - Habropoda species
and Bumblebees - Bombus species
Blueberries

Wild and farmed blueberries are nearly 100% pollinator dependent. Native and managed bees help pollinate upland fields of blueberries that at common in Northern Quebec. Quebec grows almost 50% of Canada’s blueberries

Increasing areas of blueberry farms and the clearing of forests to make room for more wild blueberries reduced the habitat available to these pollinating bees. Helping the pollinators of blueberries means leaving more areas near farms that can be used as habitat.

Carpenter Bee
NOVA SCOTIA

NOVA SCOTIA

Blueberry bees - Habropoda species
and Bumblebees - Bombus species
Blueberries

Blueberries are wild throughout the forested landscapes of Nova Scotia. Blueberries are nearly 100% pollinator dependent so without these native and managed pollinating bees we wouldn’t have much for our pies or jams!

Increasing areas of blueberry farms and the clearing of forests to make room for more wild blueberries reduced the habitat available to these pollinating bees. Helping the pollinators of blueberries means leaving more areas near farms that can be used as habitat.

SUPPORT

Honeymoon Suite

Burt’s Bees Honeymoon Suite Kit

100% of Profits donated to Pollinator Partnership Canada.

CAD $14.99

>>BUY NOW

Did you know that Bees provide well over $92 billion worth of crop pollinating services across the world. From cauliflower to kiwifruit, nectarines to lima beans, our world (and our appetites) are coloured by bees.

Help us combat bee decline in Canada by purchasing the Honeymoon suite collection by Burt’s Bees. 100% of profits will be donated to Pollinator Partnerships Canada who are dedicated to the protection and promotion of pollinators and their ecosystems.

CONTAINS

  • Naturally Nourishing Milk & Honey Body Lotion 25g
  • Hand Salve 8.5g
  • Soap Bark & Chamomile Deep Cleansing Cream 20g
  • Coconut Foot Cream 20g
  • Beeswax Lip Balm 4.25g

PARTNERS

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Burt's Bees logo
Pollinator Partnership logo
Sustainable TO Logo
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